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News Abroad


  • The Chinese Dream Imperiled

    by Andrew Meyer

    We are going to hear much in the near future about the dangers of Chinese ambition. World leaders would be well advised, however, to prepare for the dangers of internal Chinese instability. 


  • Who Can Learn From Taiwan? Apparently not WHO

    by Keith Clark

    The World Health Organization is unable to effectively learn from Taiwan's response to COVID-19 because the agency adheres to a "One China" policy that doesn't recognize both the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. 


  • The Real Thucydides Trap

    by Waller R. Newell

    Classical histories are in vogue as explanations for the Coronavirus-fueled tensions between the United States and China. A political science scholar argues that an influential theory gets Thucydides backwards.


  • The Untold Story of Boko Haram’s Origins

    by Jacob Zenn

    Researchers who view Boko Haram as a Nigerian unsurgency need to understand its history as part of pan-African Islamist networks; responses to extremism must work across national borders.


  • After 50 years of Earth Day, Will we Have 100?

    by Kimberlee Hurley

    This fiftieth celebration of Earth Day should serve as a celebration of the work that has been done. However, it should also serve as a wake-up call for the work that still needs to be done.


  • Has Italy Fallen, Again, to Dictatorship?

    by Christopher Binetti

    As a result of several factors--a tradition of temporary strongman leaders, a history of disguised dictatorship, and a unitary government for a regionally divided people--Italy has been more susceptible than other liberal democracies of falling into autocracy in the current COVID crisis. 


  • How Will History Judge Trump’s Foreign Policy?

    by Joseph S. Nye, Jr.

    Our 46th president, whenever he or she arrives, will confront a changed world, partly because of COVID, but also because of the effects of Trump’s personality and policies.


  • What the "Primacy" Debate in Foreign Policy Gets Wrong

    by Ken Weisbrode

    Yes, let’s end “endless wars” and enhance peaceable diplomacy around the world. But let us not at the same time renounce by redefinition America’s international responsibilities and its capacity for wise, moral leadership.