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military history



  • America's M4 Sherman Tank: World War II Wonder Weapon or Blunder Weapon?

    Because of its propensity to catch fire, the Sherman soon gained several nicknames. “Tommycooker” (which was a World War I trench cooker), “Ronsons” (a la the cigarette lighter that were guaranteed in their ads to “Light up the first time, every time!”), and also what the Free Poles called “The Burning Grave.”



  • The Invention That Won World War II

    by David Kindy

    Patented in 1944, the Higgins boat gave the Allies the advantage in amphibious assaults that was vital to victory on D-Day. 



  • Of Crimes and Pardons

    by Rebecca Gordon

    The United States was not always so reluctant to put national leaders on trial for their war crimes. 



  • Trump and world leaders remember D-Day

    Dozens of American veterans of D-Day were among other veterans and their families on a stage erected within the semicircular stone memorial at the Normandy American Cemetery.



  • How Many Were Killed on D-Day?

    Days before the invasion, General Dwight D. Eisenhower was told by a top strategist that paratrooper casualties alone could be as high as 75 percent.


  • D-Day 75 Years Later and the Quest for Peace

    by William Lambers

    American and allied soldiers lost their lives on D-Day so that others may live free. The best way to honor D-Day veteran’s sacrifice is to work for that elusive, but achievable eternal world peace. 


  • Remembering Rome's Liberation

    by Gregory Sumner

    Amid the anniversary of the D-Day invasion, it is important to note, too, the anniversary of an event that unfolded just two days earlier: the Allied liberation of Rome.